Interviewing Jabulani Pilime

Today we are interviewing Jabulani Pilime. His academic journey shows dedication and determination. He let nothing come in the way of achieving his goals. I am sure that his story will inspire many other students! 🙂

TWP:

Why  did you choose UNISA instead of other tertiary institutions?

Jabulani:

I could not afford to study at a full time university since I had no one to pay for my tuition fees. I needed a university which would allow me to work whilst studying. The  local (Zimbabwean) distance education university did not offer economics and employers had problems with its degrees.

TWP:

What is your source of motivation?

Jabulani:

I am motivated by the desire to give my offspring a better life than mine. I do not want any of them to grow up in Zimbabwe as it is not an ideal place if you want personal development. I want them to be in a country which gives them better prospects and the only way I can ensure that is for me to be educated and get a job outside the country of my birth.

TWP:

When did you start studying with UNISA?

Jabulani:

2007 then I had to break off study from 2008 up to 2010 due to the Zimbabwean economic crisis. I only resumed study in 2011 but registering a limited number of modules in some of the years – money problems. I had to use Messina, R.S.A,  instead  of Bulawayo ,Zimbabwe, as my examination centre in order to escape the foreign levy (now about R500 per module) charged by UNISA  for foreign based students.

TWP:

What are the things you would do differently if you were to study with UNISA again?

Jabulani:

Finances permitting, I would like to attend tutorials in R.S.A, join and participate in study groups ,buy textbooks in time, give myself more time to study and not to write exams half asleep.

TWP:

What have you learnt while studying at UNISA?

Jabulani:

UNISA does not spoon feed and is not for overgrown babies. If you want them to solve a problem go there in person. UNISA also taught me how to control my temper, I assure you if the alternative to having a go at the sometimes slow and rude immigration officials at the border is the possibility of missing an exam you will learn how to control your temper.

TWP:

What is your favourite quote?

Jabulani:

Actor Haafi

It is  a 1990’s saying from the streets of Harare literally meaning that the main actor in a movie does not die before accomplishing whatever he would have set himself to do. In real life it means that you as the main actor in your life should not falter when confronted with seemingly insurmountable odds.

TWP:

What will you be doing now that you have completed your BCom degree in economics?

Jabulani:

I have rather limited options at the moment. I would have wanted to start studying towards an honours degree in economics but I am limited by financial resources. I would have wanted to get a job related to the economics bcom since the job I am currently doing (veterinary food inspector) is in no way related to economics but at the moment it is difficult to get a job here in Zimbabwe. Working in R.S.A is another option but getting a job there is next to impossible as employment requires a permanent residence permit or a work visa which I do not have.

TWP:

What advice would you give to other UNISA students?

Jabulani:

  1. Find creative and nonviolent ways to find solutions to problems which have a direct effect on you.
  2. Jobs are scarce, if you can afford it please acquire several skills so that you stand a better chance of being employed and not starve whilst waiting to be employed in your dream job.
  3. Invest your surplus resources in interest or dividend bearing instruments rather than using them to party.

Jabulani is currently looking for a job. You can contact him via 42027454@mylife.unisa.ac.za.

Interviewed by Kurt Wyngaard

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